Posted by on Tuesday, February 6th, 2018 in
cloned pets

If you’ve ever had a pet you know how painful it is when they die. The loss is equal to a family member in most situations. If you don’t want to your goodbye to be forever, one lab is offering you an option. You can have your beloved pet cloned, and it’ll cost you just $50,000.

 

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Posted by on Wednesday, January 24th, 2018 in

For every dog owner out there, we know you’d do just about anything for your best friend. But how much would you pay to keep your pet around long after their gone?

A Texas company, Viagen Pets, is using a propriety process to preserve your dog’s DNA and their frozen cells to create an embryo to produce an identical genetic twin. In other words, they can clone your dog.

 

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Posted by on Thursday, January 18th, 2018 in

Rich Hazelwood, who owns the Celebrity Theatre, says his dog, Jackie-O, has spent years helping him introduce acts on stage.

“She became a celebrity dog,” he says of Jackie, who is now 17 and blind.

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Posted by on Thursday, January 18th, 2018 in

BOSTON (CBS) — This goes well beyond just keeping the memory of our dogs and cats alive. Some pet owners are now cloning their four-legged family members.

Yes, this is possible and it’s not cheap. Some people are spending well over the cost of a new car to keep their pet in the family.  Pets like Baxter. He’s a 9-month toy poodle. He’s also a clone.

 

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Posted by on Thursday, January 18th, 2018 in

Dolly the sheep was the first animal to be cloned from an adult cell, and like many firsts, she came to stand in for all of her kind.

So when scientists suspected she had short telomeres—stretches of DNA that normally shorten with age—people wondered if it was because she was cloned from an adult cell. When she started to limp at age five, headlines said that her arthritis “dents faith in cloning.” And when she died at age six—as the result of a common lung virus that also killed other sheep in her barn—her short life again became a parable about cloning. A certain narrative took hold.

Then last year, Kevin Sinclair, a developmental biologist at the University of Nottingham, published a paper about several clones including Dolly’s four “sisters,” who were created from the same cell line as Dolly and lived to the old age of eight (about 70 in human years). They were quite healthy for their age. So of course, he kept getting questions, like if these animals are so healthy, then why was Dolly so unhealthy? It was Dolly that everyone cared about.

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